Monday, November 28, 2022
45.3 F
Illinois
More

    Latest Posts

    Hurricane Ian Death Toll Grows To 11 But Officials Fear Hundreds Are Dead

    Hurricane Ian death toll 10 hours ago was announced at 6, but as count continues 11 so far are confirmed. Nevertheless, officials fear there are hundreds dead.

    President Joe Biden said Ian “could be the deadliest hurricane in Florida history,” responsible for a “substantial loss of life.”

    So far, reports of lives lost include six in Charlotte County; two in Lee County: two in Sarasota County, and one in Volusia County.

    Gov. Ron DeSantis declined to speculate on the Hurricane Ian death toll at multiple news conferences. DeSantis surveyed the damage in Fort Myers Beach on Thursday, saying some of it was “indescribable.”

    “There were cars floating in the middle of the water,” DeSantis said. “Some of the homes were total losses.”

    At this moment Hurricane Ian is heading towards South and North Carolina. But the hurricane will not be as strong.

    AccuWeather forecasters warned citizens of the direction of the storm.

    Hurricane warnings were issued along the entire coast of South Carolina on Thursday morning and put into effect for a section of the North Carolina coastline later in the day. By late Thursday evening, the storm’s wind speed had increased to 85 mph. As of 8 a.m., Ian was moving northward at 9 mph and was located about 175 miles to the south-southeast of Charleston, South Carolina. Maximum sustained winds were holding at 85 mph.

    Ian lost wind intensity and was downgraded to a tropical storm early Thursday morning after taking a deadly rampage across Florida, and carving a path of destruction with severe flooding.

    Governor Cooper encouraged North Carolinians to pay close attention to the weather.

    Additionally, to take necessary precautions as the remnants of Hurricane Ian approach the state.

    “Hurricane Ian reminds us how unpredictable these storms can be, and North Carolinians should be prepared when it reaches our state,” Governor Cooper said Thursday. “Heavy rains, up to seven inches in some areas, are likely to bring some flooding. Landslides are a threat in our mountains and there’s a chance of tornadoes statewide. Coastal flooding and gusty winds are likely as the storm passes through. This storm is still dangerous.”

    Latest Posts

    spot_imgspot_img

    Don't Miss